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Sub-Topics in Harper Lee

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The Theme of Social Classification and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
Social Classification and Racism There are many people who are affected by people who judge them based on their social class and skin color. For example, in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, there is a set social status in Maycomb. The “average” people look down upon the Cunninghams because they are poor; the Cunninghams...
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A Rhetorical Analysis of Atticus Finch's Speech to the Jury in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Rhetorical Analysis of Atticus Finch's Speech to the Jury In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Atticus Finch uses ethos, pathos, and logos in his speech to the jury to persuade them of Tom's innocence. His effective use of these rhetorical devices ultimately demonstrates his values and reflects his person. Though no one...
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Atticus' Defending of Tim Robinson in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
To Kill A Mockingbird Atticus was one of the first characters that came to mind when I
deciphered who could and couldn't be considered a mockingbird. He was Jem
and Scout's key role model while growing up and he tried his hardest to
separate the good from the bad for them. For example, Miss Caroline was
clearly ignora...
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5 pages
The Important Events That Will Influence Scout's Transition to Maturity in To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
Placeholder In the novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, the reader follows the life of young Alabaman girl in the 1920s in the small town of Maycomb. The protagonist, Scout Finch, encounters many events that will influence her growing-up and cause her to mature. In the final moments of the chapter, when Scout is a...
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Atticus Finch as the Moral Backbone in To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
All about Atticus In Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch plays a crucial role in the development of the story by acting as its moral backbone. He is always looked to for his infinite wisdom and to always do what is right. To Kill a Mockingbird is a story set in the racially biased 1930s. Atticus Finc...
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A Personal Review of To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
Harper Lee's masterpiece - "To Kill a Mocking Bird" is indeed
compassionate, dramatic and deeply moving. Throughout the novel, I realized
that Harper Lee is actually bringing back all the basic values in humanity.
Although she said that her book is just a simple love story, but it's
actually more - it is a...
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4 pages
The Struggles with Support and Discrimination Because of Health in the Movie Philadelphia and in the Book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Challenges of Atticus and Andrew Beckett. “Discrimination is a disease!” Roger Staubach, NFL hall of famer. Discrimination is a sensitive topic that very few people really know a lot about as it is often confused with racism and simply taught that it is a rare case in modern society, sadly truth couldn’t be any furth...
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Mayella's Upbringing in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Scottsboro Trial vs. To Kill a Mockingbird The rough upbringing of Mayella Ewell played a huge role in how she
acted in court for the Tom Robinson case. In To Kill a Mockingbird, the
general knowledge of the people of Maycomb County is this: "...their relief
check was far from enough to feed the family, and there wa...
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The Symbolism in the Title of To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
To someone who has not read To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, its title holds an obscured meaning that in many instances, prove to be misleading. For example, a mere student who has never heard of any remote details of the book may take the title too literally, because by superficial means, the book sounds like a how-to...
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird: Prejudice Is Caused by Fear
Without even the slightest hint of realization, how many times to people turn up their noses at people who are different than them? How often do people criticize others, before understanding their situations? Or perhaps, the correct question is, why do people discriminate others unlike them? To Kill a Mockingbird demonstra...
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Sibling Rivalry in To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
“With that I was gone. ‘You damn morphodite. I’ll kill you!’ He was sitting on a bed, and it was easy to grab his front hair and land one on his mouth. He slapped me and I tried another left, but a punch in the stomach sent me sprawling on the floor. It nearly knocked the breath out of me, but it didn’t matter because I kne...
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The Relation Between Coming of Age and Identity in To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
The Link Between Coming of Age and Identity Every person in the world has a unique personality that defines their character. This, in short, is called one's identity; it defines who an individual truly is and can be affected by numerous factors. Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, specifically shows how growing up a...
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The Influences from the 1950's and 1930's in To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
Historical Influences on Popular Culture: To Kill a Mockingbird Authors often use the events occurring during a specific time period in history to develop a story. Published in 1960, Nelle Harper Lee’s classic novel, To Kill a Mockingbird pulls influences from both the 1950’s and 30’s. Lee uses experiences from her childho...
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Racial Injustice in the Legal Justice System of the South in To Kill a Mocking Bird, a Novel by Harper Lee
Review of “To Kill A Mocking Bird” Harper Lee’s novel To Kill A MockingBird was a best-seller and still is. The setting is a small town in Alabama during the depression in the 1930’s. Atticus Finch is a small town white lawyer with two children named Jem and Scout. He has to defend an african american man in court who wa...
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The Symbolic of the Title of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
To Kill a Mockingbird Everyone can agree Mockingbirds are beautiful animals; their sweet
melodies can shine light onto the darkest of hours. In the book, "To Kill a
Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, the title has very little literal connection to
the plot, but it holds great symbolic weight in the book. As the story and
ch...
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An Analysis of the Character Jane Louise in the Harper Lee's Novel To Kill a Mockingbird
In Harper Lee’s “backwards sequel” to the novel To Kill A Mockingbird, Jean Louise Finch removes her rose colored glasses upon returning to her hometown of Maycomb, Alabama to see the world “Scout” grew up for what is really is: filled with hatred amongst races as well as the inequity between men and women in this small tow...
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Character Comparison in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
A strong work of literature is formed through the use of characters which constantly grow and develop throughout the work. As a novel develops, a character experiences many obstacles and achievements that affect his/her development, growth, and morals. The characters used by Harper Lee in “To Kill a Mockingbird” and Paulo C...
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A Comparison of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee and Fences by Augusta Wilson
Comparative Literature Essay Authors consistently use character foils in their novels to further develop their characters' traits and to deepen the reader’s knowledge and understanding of the major characters and themes. In both To Kill A Mockingbird and Fences the authors use character foils. In To Kill A Mockingbird Atti...
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Family, Death and Promises in the Novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The realistic fiction novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, is about family, death and promises. The character of Scout Finch is a young girl and is also the narrator in the story. The character of Jem Finch is Scouts brother who is protective of Scout. The character Arthur “Boo” Radley is the neighbor of Scout, stays...
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The Theme of Innocence in the Novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird Innocence is defined as being free from guilt or sin. This is evident throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The novel is set in Maycomb, Alabama a very dull town during the 1930s which happened to be a very racist time. Everyone from town knows each other and one can n...
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The Character of Mayella Violet Ewell in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
In the coming of age novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee portrays many characters in various ways, but none more insidious than Mayella Violet Ewell. Mayella is the story’s boldest antagonist. She is a static character who undergoes no inner change throughout the story, although is one of the most influential charact...
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The Theme of Sympathy in the Book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
You see the child walk into your store. He has baggy clothes, scuffed up sneakers, and a dark gray hoodie. You watch him for a couple minutes and see that he keeps looking over his shoulders whenever he touches the merchandise. Another thief, you say to yourself. You decide to follow him around to catch him in the act. A g...
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Jim Crow Laws and To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Jim Crow and To Kill a Mockingbird (Research paper) “It shall be unlawful for a Negro and white person to play together or in company with each other at any game of pool or billiards.” This law by the state of Alabama was just one of the many ridiculous laws of the early 1900’s. These particular laws, separating races and...
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Writing Truthfully in the Novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Just Write What You Know Harper Lee, author of bestselling novel To Kill a Mockingbird, once said that “A writer should write about what he knows and write truthfully” (“To Kill a Mockingbird”), and while To Kill a Mockingbird is classified as a fiction novel, the characters, events, and situations illustrated were based o...
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An Analysis of Parent-Child Relationship in to Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee
Parental Analysis, To Kill a Mockingbird In most families, the parental figure(s) in a child’s early life provide a foundation for how the child will develop and thrive as a teen, and later an adult. Several factors that can affect the way a child develops psychologically include the family’s income level, whether or not t...
1,578 words
5 pages