It looks like you've lost connection to our server. Please check your internet connection or reload this page.

Pop Art Essay Examples

1,819 total results
A Comparative Analysis of the Pop Art in America and Great Britain
Pop Art; an Introduction to the Era; In this investigation I plan to conduct an investigation into the similarities and differences between American and British pop art. Pop art started in the late 1950's in England, and grew in the United States in the early 1960's. English art critic Lawrence Holloway first used the term...
2,386 words
5 pages
An Introduction to the Pop Art Movement in London
Pop Art The pop art movement began in London during the 1950's and then quickly spread throughout nearly all of the industrialized world. Although the artists did have some overlapping styles, pop art focuses more on the subject and less on style, which was left up to each individual artist. The main themes that is evide...
548 words
1 page
An Introduction to the History and the Origins of Pop Art
The birth of Pop art (short for Popular art) emerged in England between the years of 1950 and 1960, but heightened to its full potential in New York. Pop art was a form of rebellion against Abstract Expressionism. Pop artists felt that “Abstract Expressionism was an elite art, to which only a tiny class, mainly of painters...
308 words
1 page
A Description of the Pop Art Movement Which Began in London During the 1950s
The pop art movement began in London during the 1950's and then
quickly spread throughout nearly all of the industrialized world. Although the
artists did have some overlapping styles, pop art focuses more on the subject and
less on style, which was left up to each individual artist. The main themes that is
evident in all p...
1,734 words
4 pages
A History and the Influences of Pop-Art, a Modern Art Direction
Pop Art is images of popular things. Pop-art is images of ordinary objects, mass produced common everyday items that most people like and recognize. items like record labels, or logos, or packaging, and fashion pictures of people, Road signs, hamburgers, money, soda bottles, ( you know, stuff you see around you, anything...
1,107 words
2 pages
An Introduction to the History of the Pop Art Movement in 1950s
Pop Art The pop art movement began in London during the 1950's and then quickly spread throughout nearly all of the industrialized world. Although the artists did have some overlapping styles, pop art focuses more on the subject and less on style, which was left up to each individual artist. The main themes that is ev...
1,736 words
4 pages
Andy Warhol: The Father of pop Art
Andy Warhol: The Father of Pop Art Andy Warhol has spewed forth in many examples of the modern style that is known as "Pop art," in various mediums -spanning from silkscreen to a cable network. Not only has Warhol greatly contributed to this revolutionary style, but also in many ways, he has created it. Andy Warh...
1,500 words
3 pages
The History of Pop Art in America
CORITA KENT By John Keleher 12/14/00 American Pop Art was born of the newly found self-confidence with which American art had asserted itself. The subject matter which provided the initial impulse was the cultural concept of Americanism itself: the idea of progress, the media industry sensation, and the relative boom of...
1,600 words
4 pages
Andy Warhol and the Birth of Pop Art: Expect the Unexpected
Andy Warhol Andy Warhol, the American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and filmmaker was born in Pittsburgh on August 6, 1928, shortly afterwards settling in New York. The only son of immigrant, Czech parents, Andy finished high school and went on to the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, graduating in 1949 w...
1,902 words
4 pages
What is Pop Culture?
Iphones, Facebook, Twilight, Lady Gaga, Justin Beber, Holister, like them or hate them all of these are things influencing our culture right now. Will they affect future generations, maybe, but more likely, they will only be remembered or laughed at just as the big hair and shoulder pads of the eighties. Our pop culture wil...
321 words
1 page
An Introduction to the History of Pop Music
“Talk about Pop Music, Talk about Pop Music…” was one of the most catchy phrases of the 1980’s. Just as in the 80’s, today we see many characteristics of “pop culture” effecting our lives. But, what is “pop culture?” I spent some time online trying to answer my question and time after time I was led to the same direction:...
882 words
2 pages
An Analysis of the Influence of Pop Culture
Influence of Pop Culture Over my last nineteen years, I have not noticed how much pop culture influences the youth of today. I have always thought people did what they wanted to do when they wanted to do it, not because of the way the society imposes a way for people to live. Pop culture is the culture is the way of lif...
834 words
2 pages
A History of Art in the 1940-1960's United States
The 1940s through the 1960s were not only some of the most socially and politically volatile times in American History, but were the catalyst for the numerous changes in which occurred in American Popular culture during these and following years. Instead of experiencing the trauma which resulted after World War Is end, post...
3,564 words
8 pages
Life and Art of Keith Haring
Keith Haring was an American painter, whose simple, symbol-like drawings of dogs, babies, and dancing figures brought him to international acclaim during the 1980s. While making art that spoke directly of love, he raged against intolerance and shared the distress about the world around him. He believed art was a tool of com...
1,889 words
4 pages
An Analysis and an Introduction to the Changes in Pop Art
“Changes in Pop Art” “Pop art” was a 20th century art movement that utilized consumerism and popular culture. Andy Warhol, for example, changed the imagery of everyday objects, as well as entertainment figures, through distorted shapes, sizes, and bold colors. As the decades passed, the style of “pop art” slightly changed...
943 words
2 pages
A Self-Analysis on How I Depict Art
To see a scorned, beaten, and crucified man, lying dead in the arms of his mother is an image, which can inspire overwhelming emotions within the heart of an observer. Yet, for the longest time I've had such difficulty looking at Michelangelo's art in this way. To me, art has never been about expressing oneself or conveying...
460 words
1 page
Art as a Means of Expressing Spiritual Beliefs
Balance of Man and Nature in Japanese and Australian Aboriginal Art Many cultures use art as a means of expression of their spiritual beliefs. Religion has been a common theme seen in several art medians. This influence can be seen in architecture, painting, sculptures, and decorative arts. The two different art styles that...
1,196 words
3 pages
The Importance of Studying Art
Art is something which can be analyzed to give deeper insight as to the common values and beliefs shared by the members of a certain society. Regardless of the place of origin or the time period of a form of art, it will always be a reflection of the social structure in which it's creator/s lived. However, the way the artis...
1,755 words
4 pages
An Analysis of the Renaissance Art as a Period Which is Considered Most Important
Man has been creating art for over 30,000 years. There are cave drawings, sculptures, Egyptian art, Greek Art, Modern Art and plenty more but to many, the Renaissance Art period is considered to be most important. Never had so many geniuses in art lived at one time and never had so many pieces of cherished art been produced...
1,863 words
4 pages
A Look at the Emotional Aspect of Art
Throughout time, art has been cherished as a gateway to provoking thought from a hemisphere of the brain most people would otherwise rarely use. A person who has strength in both logic and creativity has always been praised as an enriched mind. Understanding art can bring about emotions and thoughts that can be both positiv...
1,140 words
3 pages
An Analysis of the Experience With Art
From an early age I have always had a strong interest in art, and have been involved with it in some form all through my life. In year nine I realised that it was something that I might like to pursue as a career, I started taking it more seriously. The Chase’s art department encouraged me very well and helped me develo...
608 words
1 page
The History and Characteristics of Pop Art
The late 1950s saw a new movement in the art world this became known as "pop art" due to the fact that the artists in this movement with this movement manly Andy Warhol and Roy Lichensten of the unites states as well as David Hockney and Derek Boshier of Great Britain, used elements of popular culture as main sour...
1,961 words
4 pages
Andy Warhol's Impact on Modern Art
Andy Warhol's Impact On Art
andy warhol's impact on art Page 1 Andrew Warhola was born August Sixth, 1928, in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. He was the youngest son of Julie and Andrej Warhola, both immigrants from Czechoslovakia. After a quiet childhood spent alternately alone and in art classes, Andrew went to college. He then...
3,175 words
7 pages
Art Imitating Life Imitating Art: Andy Warhol and Pop-Art
Art Imitating Life Imitating Art
The late 1950s saw a new movement in the art world this became known as "pop art" due to the fact that the artists in this movement with this movement manly Andy Warhol and Roy Lichensten of the unites states as well as David Hockney and Derek Boshier of Great Britain, used element...
2,075 words
5 pages
A Look at the Changes in Pop Art
Changes In Pop Art
“Changes in Pop Art”
“Pop art” was a 20th century art movement that utilized consumerism and popular culture. Andy Warhol, for example, changed the imagery of everyday objects, as well as entertainment figures, through distorted shapes, sizes, and bold colors. As the decades passed, the style of “pop art”...
950 words
2 pages