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The Bluest Eye Essay Examples

315 total results
A Review of Toni Morrison's First Novel The Bluest Eye
Readers of Toni Morrison's first novel, The Bluest Eye, are often so overwhelmed by the narrative's emotional content--the child Pecola's incestuous rape, ensuing pregnancy, and subsequent abandonment by her community and descent into madness--that they miss the music in this lyrically "songified" narrative. [1] M...
267 words
1 page
A Study of the Human Eye
The human eye is a wonderful thing. It lets us view things. They can give us another eye color, or we could just use them to simply view things. But it’s not that simple you see. Some people aren’t that lucky, and have impaired vision. This includes near-sightedness and far-sightedness. To begin though we must understand ho...
679 words
2 pages
Racism in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye
Racism is the belief that one ethnic group is superior to the other. In the 1930’s and 1940’s racism was at a very evident point, as addressed in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye. Pecula, an eleven year old black girl is obsessed about wanting to change her appearances. Pecula uses Shirley Temple and the color of eyes as a r...
1,214 words
3 pages
Unequal Opportunities Because of Differences: An Analysis of Two Pieces of Literature
Stated in the novel Rereading America,``Under pressure of the myth [of
individual opportunity], we become engrossed in status symbols: we try
to live in the `right' neighborhoods, wear the `right' clothes,[and] eat
the `right' food'' (255). This quote illustrates that members of a
society try to fit in with the norms that...
1,644 words
4 pages
The Body and the Satisfaction of Others
All the collected dated from The Bluest Eye, The Handmaids Tale and The Handmaids Tale novels bluntly introduced, how the body is used for others entertainment and self-satisfaction. The morality, in which others should familiarize one’s body to the world, would be the most common approach. In the reading we are shown a dif...
930 words
2 pages
An Analysis of the Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
The Bluest Eye In a film interview, Morrison has stated, "I suppose The Bluest Eye is about one's dependency on the world for identification,self-value, feelings of worth." Toni Morrison has been consistently insightful and helpful critic of her work. With regard to herfirst novel, she has indicated that her pl...
382 words
1 page
Analysis of the Bluest Eye, a Novel by Toni Morrison and the Quest for Individual Identity
Post World War I, many new opportunities were given to the growing and expanding group of African Americans living in the North. Almost 500,000 African Americans moved to the northern states between 1910 and 1920. This was the beginning of a continuing migration northward. More than 1,500,000 blacks went north in the 1930's...
2,754 words
6 pages
An Analysis of Toni Morrison's Novel "The Bluest Eye" Based on the Critiques of Raymond Hedin and Madonne Miner
Fight Against Oppression!!!! In the novel, The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison, the evils inflicted upon blacks by a white society indoctrinated by the inherent beauty of whiteness and ugliness of blackness are thoroughly depicted. Morrison?s novel illustrates the disastrous affects racism had on African-Americans during the...
1,635 words
4 pages
The Concept of Racial Self-Hatred in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
RACIAL SELF LOATHING IN THE BLUEST EYE In "The Bluest Eye", author Toni Morrison builds a story around the concept of racial self-hatred and how it comes to exist in the mind of a young child. "The Bluest Eye" deals directly with the individual psychology of the main character, Pecola Breedlove. So inte...
1,081 words
2 pages
A Comparison Between Alice Walker's the Color Purple and Toni Morrison's the Blue Eye
In African-American texts, blacks are seen as struggling with the patriarchal worlds they live in order to achieve a sense of Self and Identity. The texts I have chosen illustrate the hazards of Western religion, Rape, Patriarchal Dominance and Colonial notions of white supremacy; an intend to show how the protagonists of A...
2,793 words
6 pages
An Analysis of the Breedlove Family in Toni Morrison's 'The Bluest Eye'
 The Breedlove family knows pain. They know their ugliness, too, and therefore they know loneliness, hardship, and misery. Their poverty envelops them in shame, forcing them to accept their defect. The Breedloves find the confinement of their poverty distressing, frustrating, and oftentimes infuriating. Thus, each Breedlov...
1,195 words
3 pages
Damage Caused by Internalized Racism in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye
A Report on The Bluest Eye In The Bluest Eye (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970), Toni Morrison tells the story of a young girl who wants the bluest eyes. Toni Morrison, a teacher, editor, and writer has written four books. The Bluest Eye talks about Pecola Breedlove life through domestic violence, family relat...
543 words
1 page
The Heart Breaking Story of a Little Black Girl Living in Lorain in the Book "The Blue Eye"
Final Book Report III Toni Morrisons, The Bluest Eye, Alice Walkers , The Color Purple , and Richard Wrights autobiography , Black Boy , all represent prejudicy . The preceding novels show the characters were typical victims, not understading the division of power amongst races. The Bluest Eye , a heart break...
1,720 words
4 pages
An Analysis of the Novel The Bluest Eye
Background Published in 1970, The Bluest Eye came about at a critical moment in the history of American civil rights. Morrison began Pecola's story as a short piece in1962; it became a novel-in-progress by 1965. It was written, as one can see from the dates, during the years of some of the most dynamic and turbulent...
501 words
1 page
A Literary Analysis of the Bluest Eye by Toni Morisson
Toni Morisson's novel The Bluest Eye is about the life of the Breedlove family who resides in Lorain, Ohio, in the late 1930s. This family consists of the mother Pauline, the father Cholly, the son Sammy, and the daughter Pecola. The novel's focal point is the daughter, an eleven-year-old Black girl who is trying to conquer...
1,204 words
3 pages
Prejudicy in the Bluest Eye, Alice Walkers, the Color Purple and Black Boy
Toni Morrisons, The Bluest Eye, Alice Walkers , The Color Purple , and Richard Wrights autobiography , Black Boy , all represent prejudicy . The preceding novels show the characters were typical victims, not understading the division of power amongst races. The Bluest Eye , a heart breaking story of a little back girl l...
1,709 words
4 pages
A Literary Analysis of the Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
Beauty is something that a lot of people in life strive for, because everyone has fitted in their mind what exactly beauty is. People know that it can help you out in life. But what most people dont know is that, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Meaning that beauty should not be characterized by what people are told it...
559 words
1 page
A Book Analysis of the Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
In the book the Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison redefines American History and the place of Afro-American culture within it. She reveals the microcosm of that of Afro-American cultures, to the Macrocosm of all that of societies cultures. She reveals the definition of beauty and the societal prejudices that are prevalent today....
415 words
1 page
A Comparison of Sula and the Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison in African-American Literature
Toni Morrison: The bluest eye and Sula African- American folklore is arguably the basis for most African- American literature. In a country where as late as the 1860's there were laws prohibiting the teaching of slaves, it was necessary for the oral tradition to carry the values the group considered significant. Transition...
2,357 words
5 pages
The Illustration of Evil Inflicted Upon the Blacks in Toni Morrison's Novel "The Bluest Eyes"
In the novel, The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison, the evils inflicted upon blacks by a white society indoctrinated by the inherent beauty of whiteness and ugliness of blackness are thoroughly depicted. Morrisons novel illustrates the disastrous affects racism had on African-Americans during the late nineteen hundreds. The Blu...
1,608 words
4 pages
A Summary of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
Claudia and Frieda MacTeer live in Lorain, Ohio with their parents. Their lives are hard, but their parents provide a loving household. To make money, their parents take in a boarder, Henry Washington. Soon after, another young girl, named Pecola, comes to live with the MacTeers after her father, Cholly, burned down her hou...
479 words
1 page
A Literary Analysis of Bluest Eye and a Comparison to Giovanni's Room
Bluest Eye And Giovanni's Room
There are several novels written by two of the worlds most critically acclaimed literary writers of the 20th century James Baldwin and Toni Morrison. But I would like to focus on just two of their works, James Baldwin's Giovanni's Room, and Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye. In these novels in so...
245 words
1 page
An Analysis of the Ideal of Beauty in Toni Morrison's Novel The Bluest Eye
Bluest Eye By Toni Morrison
Beauty is something that a lot of people in life strive for, because everyone
has fitted in their mind what exactly beauty is. People know that it can help
you out in life. But what most people don't know is that, beauty is in the eye
of the beholder. Meaning that beauty should not be characteriz...
568 words
1 page
A Comparison of Memoirs of a Geisha by Golden and The Bluest Eye by Morrison
Comparison Essay Of Memoirs Of A Geisha And The Bluest Eye
Memoirs of a Geisha by Aurthor Golden and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison are two thought provoking books with a unique style of writing. Memoirs of a Geisha has a beautiful poetic grammar which captures readers imagination and brings the story to life. Morrison on...
602 words
1 page
An Analysis of The Bluest Eye, a Short Novel by Toni Morrison
Pecola
The Breedlove family has moved from the rural south to urban Lorain, Ohio, and the displacement, in addition to grinding work conditions and poverty, contributes to the family's dysfunction. Told from the perspectives of the adolescent sisters, Claudia and Frieda MacTeer, Morrison's narrative weaves its way through t...
441 words
1 page