It looks like you've lost connection to our server. Please check your internet connection or reload this page.
1
30+
250
8000+
Mr. Collins' Experience in Longbourn in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Mr. Collins’s first impression of Longbourn was one of mild disdain. Why Mr. Bingley had any business in a place like this, Collins couldn’t ascertain. However, seeing as the trip would give Collins the opportunity to visit the Bennets, who were members of his more extended family, Collins wasn’t too inflamed concerning the...
1,077 words
3 pages
The Differences Between Marianne and Elinor From Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
“Sense and Sensibility” was written by Jane Austin and was her first published novel. Austin’s novel was published in 1811 and has become one of her best, well-known novels to this day. The main idea of this paper is to differentiate between sense and sensibility. The difference is represented by the two sisters in the nove...
1,118 words
5 pages
The Differences Between Marianne and Elinor in the Novel Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
“Sense and Sensibility” was written by Jane Austin and was her first published novel. Austin’s novel was published in 1811 and has become one of her best, well-known novels to this day. The main idea of this paper is to differentiate between sense and sensibility. The difference is represented by the two sisters in the nove...
1,125 words
5 pages
Marianne as Introvert in Sense & Sensibility by Jane Austen
Reflections on Marianne as Introvert Jane Austen seems to treat Marianne in Sense & Sensibility (1811) as an ostentatiously romantic character in both the term for the period (expressed through her sensibility) and the term for the feeling (expressed through her love of Willoughby). Her heart is certainly worn on her sleev...
388 words
2 pages
The Use of Harriet Smith as a Foil Character in Jane Austen's Emma
Foil Character Open Question The common adage “opposites attract” rings especially true in Jane Austen’s Emma -- or at least in the close friendship between the main character Emma Woodhouse and her companion Harriet Smith. Harriet’s naïve innocence, romantic attitude, and dependent nature provide a stark contrast to Emma’...
544 words
2 pages
The Changes in Women and Love in Jane Austen's Persuasion
Change of View Jane Austen (December 16,1775 – July 18, 1817) lived in an era where marriage dictated the condition in which a person lived their adult life. A woman’s quality of life was decided solely through the status of her husband and apart from marrying, had few options in life in terms of career. Austen’s other n...
1,426 words
5 pages
A Comparison of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and Emma by Jane Austen
It can be argued the early 19th century novels “Jane Eyre” and “Emma” are progressive in their beliefs and to some extent disrupt the view that women in literature are defined by their relationship with men; the term meaning that upon being with a man, a woman is essentially a man’s property, dominated by him socially, poli...
2,052 words
6 pages
A Personal Analysis of Persuasion, a Novel by Jane Austen
Great Works of Literature: Jane Austen’s “Persuasion” Historical Context While very ill, Jane Austen wrote Persuasion in 1816 before her death at her home in Chawton, England, a village fifty-two miles southwest of London (her novel would be published two years later). Southern England at the beginning of the nineteenth c...
1,528 words
5 pages
The Use of Literary Devices to Explore the Societal Issue of Inequality in the Novels, A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole and Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Discrimination has been and continues to be a prevalent part of human history. In every society there is a group of individuals who are viewed as inferior. Both John Kennedy Toole and Jane Austen use literary devices to explore the societal issue of inequality in their respective novels A Confederacy of Dunces and Pride and...
714 words
3 pages
Gossip, Limited Omniscience and Ambiguity in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen classically formulates a novel by
presenting a variety of methods of knowledge, none of which leads to a
specific conclusion. Through the use of gossip and limited omniscience,
Austen stimulates ambiguity as to the method by which the expected results
of the story will occur. Gossip...
463 words
2 pages