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Modern Liberal Thinkers Essay Examples

2,444 total results
An Introduction to the History of the Liberal Party in Canada
A liberal, by definition is a person who favours reform, especially in government, economics, and religion, and who prefers democratic or republican forms of government in a constitutional state. This definition generally outlines the definition of the Liberal Party of Canada but as we will see the Liberals are often diffic...
743 words
2 pages
The Victory of the British Liberal Party in 1906 Victory and Its Popular Actions Thereafter
The huge scale of the Liberal party's victory in the 1906 general election guaranteed many new faces among the ranks of Liberal MPs, in favour of change in the field of social welfare. Between the years 1906 and 1914, the Liberals took steps to improve the health standards and the living and working conditions of the lower...
2,277 words
5 pages
John Locke's View on the Right of Property
Mathew Jelonkiewicz Answered Question #2 Lockes Ideas on Property John Locke was considered one of the first modern liberal thinkers of our times. His ideas and theories permeate throughout many of the democratic worlds constitutions. He authored many essays during his lifetime but one of the more famous ones w...
1,355 words
3 pages
Isaiah Berlin, One of the Finest Liberal Thinkers of the 20th Century
Isaiah Berlin became one of our centurys most important political theorists for liberty and liberalism in an age of totalitarianism. He was born in Riga, Latvia in 1909 into a well to do Jewish family. At the age of 12 he moved to Petrograd and experienced first hand the Bolshevik revolution, which would later influence his...
2,134 words
5 pages
Newman’s Liberal Knowledge versus Ramapo College’s General Education Curriculum
Prompt: In approximately 3 pages, argue that Ramapo College is or is not
succeeding in delivering a liberal arts education, as defined by Newman,
through its GenEd curriculum. Students are required to take General Education courses at Ramapo
College before they are allowed to graduate with a degree. These courses
are consi...
1,007 words
2 pages
How Effectively Did the Liberal Government Meet the Needs of the British People?
How effectively did the Liberal government meet the needs of the British people? The Liberal government implemented a number of reforms some of which were helpful to the public and some of which were not. The Liberal welfare reform legislation was grouped into five main categories. The first of these was the Young people...
1,503 words
3 pages
A Comparison of Neoliberalism and Ordoliberalism by Gandhis Notion
My notion of democracy is that under it the weakest should have the same opportunity as the strongest.- Mahatma Gandhi. In this paper, I will show the differences between two types of liberal thought, Neoliberalism and Ordoliberalism, that have attempted to achieve Gandhis notion. Merriam-Webster defines Neo-liberalism as...
1,607 words
4 pages
An Analysis the Prime Minister Campbell-Bannerman and How Successful Was He as the Leader of the Liberal Party
How successful was Campbell-Bannerman in his decade as the leader of the Liberal party? In order to rate how successful Henry Campbell-Bannerman was, his aims must be identified, and then measured against the results he achieved. As Campbell-Bannerman also has the added complication of becoming Prime Minister halfway his...
918 words
2 pages
A Discussion on the Liberal Democrats and Welfare Reform
The Liberal Democratic stance on Welfare Reform is one of extensive change. The party has always been associated with efforts to impede long-standing, worn out policies that, in the Lib-Dems perception, sustain old guard ideas that are not progressive enough. The Liberal Democrats President is Charles Kennedy. Kennedy has a...
568 words
1 page
An Analysis of Liberal Arts as a Universal Education
An Education in Liberal Arts
An Education
in Liberal Arts
Liberal arts is a universal education
that provides a strong foundation of knowledge in many subjects. Liberal
arts can observe the capabilities as well as the limitations of each field
of study. This allows students to find connections between different fields
of st...
415 words
1 page
The Importance of Education in Liberal Arts
An Education in Liberal Arts Liberal arts is a universal education that provides a strong foundation of knowledge in many subjects. Liberal arts can observe the capabilities as well as the limitations of each field of study. This allows students to find connections between different fields of study, to explore them, and to...
410 words
1 page
An Analysis of Liberal Democracy
What is liberal democracy Liberal democracy is a particular form of democracy which is based upon a fundamental set of assumptions about the individual, the state and society. What are these basic assumptions and how far does liberal democracy succeed in its main aims? Francis Fukuyama in 1989 declared The end of history...
1,816 words
4 pages
An Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Liberal Government and the Reforms It Made in Britain
How effectively did the Liberal government meet the needs of the British people? The Liberal government implemented a number of reforms some of which were helpful to the public and some of which were not. The Liberal welfare reform legislation was grouped into five main categories. The first of these was the Young people,...
1,512 words
3 pages
The Key Aspects of a Liberal Education in Russel Bertrand's "The Place of Science in a Liberal Education"
In his essay, "The Place of Science in a Liberal Education," Russell Bertrand explains how a liberal education is obtained through a literary education and an education based on science. His goal is not to attack literary education, but to draw attention to theachievements and excellencies in science in the presen...
657 words
1 page
An Introduction to the History and Origins of Liberal Democracy
This essay will deal mainly with the origins of Liberal Democracy, and will say only a little about its current prospects. I turn to the history, however, because I believe we can learn from it a great deal about the strengths and weaknesses of liberal democray and therefore its prospects. Indeed, what I wish to sress is a...
1,124 words
2 pages
The Evolution of the New Liberalism During the Liberal War Reforms
With what success did the Liberal Governments attempt to improve the quality of life of the working?The 1906 election, and subsequent landslide victory for the Liberals, was the first step toward the introduction of a welfare state. The Conservatives who were in power up to 1906 had basically ignored the concept of social r...
986 words
2 pages
Understanding the Liberal Arts Education Model
A Liberal Arts Education A liberal arts education provides students with a broad spectrum of information enabling them to expand knowledge and to advance society in a positive direction. This universal education provides a strong foundation of knowledge in many subjects. The students can observe the strengths and cap...
1,444 words
3 pages
Liberal Government Pass Bills to Address Disease and Health Problem
To what extent did the Liberal Government (1906 to 1914) set up a welfare state in Britain? A welfare state is a state with social services controlled or financed by the Government. These services aim to protect society’s weakest members from the cradle to the grave; from birth to death. As Beveridge described it, a welfar...
1,103 words
2 pages
The Three Phases of Human History According to Western Liberal Scholars
Western liberal scholars have divided human history into three phases: the premodern, the modern and the post modern. Each phase has no definite end, rather they layer on top of each. For example, a thoroughly post modern society has elements of premodern and modern in it. There is no one exact time when the premodern ended...
3,562 words
8 pages
An Analysis of the Meaning of Life in the Works of the Key Thinkers in Modern Existentialism
Arguably one of the most pondered questions in philosophical thought has been, What is the meaning of life? Humans have been put on this earth with the knowledge of self awareness and the ability to manipulate the environments that they inhabit to a greater extent than any other species on the planet. Ultimately one must w...
3,404 words
8 pages
The Thinkers of the Enlightenment Era Are Committed to Secular Views
The Enlightenment is a name given by historians to an intellectual movement that was predominant in the Western world during the 18th century. Strongly influenced by the rise of modern science and by the aftermath of the long religious conflict that followed the Reformation, the thinkers of the Enlightenment (called...
905 words
2 pages
An Overview of Modern Liberalism
Today, in classrooms across the country, Liberal economic theory is being taught to students eager (or not so eager) to soak it in like so much "mother's milk." The language of the Liberal approach has been infused into various elements of American life - everything from the educational marketplace, to U.S. foreig...
1,878 words
4 pages
What Makes a Genius
The word genius can be used to describe a person, an idea or an invention. As a person, a genius is one that stands out from a crowd and tackles the most difficult of problems in the simplest of ways. A genius is not only very clever, but instinctively thinks outside the box. The term genius is often used to describe peo...
954 words
2 pages
The Foundation of Democracy
Foundation, what does that word really mean? The Greeks gave us the foundation of Democracy and everything else for that matter. When it all started no one really knew what a Democracy was until someone decided to start digging new ground. Pre- Socratic thinkers were the ones that gave us our philosophies, Gods, and Goddess...
391 words
1 page
A History on Enlightenment Thinkers of 18th-Century France
18th-Century France During the eighteenth century, Enlightenment thinkers transformed western Europe into a modern society. Critical of orthodoxy, these philosophes radically changed the way men thought about religion, economics, political philosophy, and education. Their method was rational and secular, founded on a b...
1,913 words
4 pages