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The Kiowa Indians Essay Examples

478 total results
Medicine Lodge Treaty Assigned Lands for the Kiowa Indians
The earliest written mention of the Kiowa Indians, of the mid-west plains, was in 1682 by Ren Robert Cavelier who heard of them from a captive Pani slave, boy at Fort St. Louis who called them Manrhouts and Gattacha. The Kiowa are a group of warrior plains people who lived on the southern Great Plains. They became known as...
1,259 words
3 pages
The Stories and Myths Surrounding the Kiowa Indians
The earliest written mention of the Kiowa Indians was in 1682 by Ren Robert Cavelier who heard of them from a captive Pani slave, boy at Fort St. Louis who called them Manrhouts and Gattacha. The Kiowa are a group of warrior plains people who lived on the southern Great Plains. They became one of the most hated and feared o...
2,694 words
6 pages
The History of the Northern Indians and Their Migration Patterns
Northeastern Indians The Northeastern Indians are the Indians who live in the Northeast part of the United States. The area consists of three types of land: the coast of the ocean, fertile valleys and forests. Therefore, their three main occupations were fishing, farming and hunting. No one is exactly sure how the North...
871 words
2 pages
A History of the Mistreatment of the North and Central American Indians
The Mistreatment of the North and Central American Indian Through out the years, many Native Americans have been cruelly punished for the greed of other countries. I absolutely disagree with the European's idea that they could just invade a new land, kill the natives, decide to, "own" the land that rightfully...
1,398 words
3 pages
A History of the Apache and the Cherokee Indians
The Apache Indians of North America prospered for years throughout Kansas, New Mexico, and Arizona. They were a religious society who believed in a giver of life. As any complex society today, The Apache had many inter-tribal differences, although the tribe as a whole was able to see through these conflicts. Women and the...
623 words
1 page
An Analysis of the Origin, Culture and History of the Cherokee Indians in the United States
Cherokee Indians The Cherokee Indians are a very interesting and prominent tribe in our nation. This paper will explain their origin, culture, growth, removal, and many other details about this Native American tribe. The Cherokee Indians covered a vast part of the United States southeastern region. They lived in the Appa...
835 words
2 pages
A Glimpse Into the Life and Culture of the Aztec Indians
The Aztec Indians, who are known for their domination of southern and central Mexico, ruled between the 14th and 16th centuries. They built a great empire and developed very modernized ways of doing things. They had phenomenal architectural skills and waterway systems. The Aztec Indians also had very developed social class...
1,048 words
2 pages
History of the Origin and the Culture of the Northeastern Indians
Northeastern Indians The Northeastern Indians are the Indians who live in the Northeast part of the United States. The area consists of three types of land: the coast of the ocean, fertile valleys and forests. Therefore, their three main occupations were fishing, farming and hunting. No one is exactly sure how the Northea...
871 words
2 pages
A Look at Escarvations and Explorations of the Remains of Paleo-Indians
Twenty thousand years ago during the time of the last ice age period, many colossal mammals roamed North America. They survived during the times when much of the earth was covered by immense large bodies of ice that buried forests, fields, and mountains, but rapidly became extinct after the ice began to retreat and melt....
1,775 words
4 pages
The History and Migration of Crow Indians
Most of the Crow Indians reside in Southeastern Montana, while many others are scattered among the Northern Plains of the USA. The Crow Indians have lived in this area for at least 300 years. Many problems arouse whether they had to do with war, politics, or land ownership issues. The Crow Indians are not known as a war-goi...
314 words
1 page
The Occupation of the Apache Indians, Pueblo Indians and Navajo Indians in America
         American Indians are sometimes also known as Native Americans. Native meaning original. However, nowadays their population is fading away. Once they made the initial marks on this land, now they are a forgotten story. There were about four hundred different kinds of tribes living in nine major areas. One of the nin...
541 words
1 page
A Study of the Kiowa Tribe and Scott Momaday's The Way to Rainy Mountain
Introduction
Scott Momaday, in the memoir The Way to Rainy Mountain, traces the ancestral roots of his tribe back to the start of the Kiowa tribe. Momaday has always known his ancestry, but the death of Aho, his grandmother, prompt him to seek an in depth personal exploration of his family history and background. Therefore,...
909 words
2 pages
An Analysis of the Book The Way to Rainy Mountain by N. Scott Momaday
Various English EssaysN. Scott Momaday divides his book The Way to Rainy Mountain in an interesting manner. The book is divided into three chapters, each of which contains a dozen or so numbered sections, each of which is divided into three parts. The first part of each numbered section tends to be a legend or a story of th...
667 words
1 page
An Analysis of the Sections in the Novel The Way to Rainy Mountain by N. Scott Momaday
N. Scott Momaday divides his book The Way to Rainy Mountain in an interesting manner. The book is divided into three chapters, each of which contains a dozen or so numbered sections, each of which is divided into three parts. The first part of each numbered section tends to be a legend or a story of the Kiowa culture. Howev...
665 words
1 page
An Analysis of The Songmaker, a Painting by Blackbear Bosin
The Songmaker by Blackbear Bosin, displayed at the Indian Center Museum in Wichita, is an interesting painting. The painting was done in 1970 using gouache and painted on a thirty inch by twenty-two inch canvas. It is in a private collection and the value of the painting is unknown. The Songmaker is a Kiowa Medicine Man wh...
504 words
1 page
Asian Indians Around the World
According to the Census Board of 2011, in nineteen states out of
twenty-six states, Asian Indians have emerges as the largest subgroup in
the United States, following Chinese immigrants. California being the
biggest magnets for Indian immigrants had the population increase of
sixty-eight percent from 2000 to 2010 to 528,000...
2,634 words
6 pages
A Brief History of the Cherokee Indians
The Cherokee Indians first lived in Tennessee. The name Indian first came from Christopher Columbus, who thought that America was part of the Indies, Asia. The first person to come across Indians was Hernando de Soto, in 1540. In wintertime the Indian men wore long sleeved shirts, loose fitting leggings, and moosehide mocc...
467 words
1 page
Diabetes is the Most Common Health Problem Faced by American Indians
"Diabetes Mellitus" Diabetes mellitus is one of the most serious health problems facing the Native American Indians today. The disease is very common in many tribes cross the United States. "Diabetes plagues our Navajo people and will continue to be an epidemic disease until each of us takes action"....
1,130 words
3 pages
A Paper on Native Americans Tribes of Ocheese Creek Indians
The name "Creek" came from the shortening of Ocheese Creek Indians a name given by the English to the native people living along the Ocheese Creek. In time, the name was given to all groups of the Native American Confederacy. All tribes living in Georgia were known to be good hunters and farmers so food was usually not a pr...
632 words
1 page
A Review of Jane Tompkin's Indians: Textualism, Morality and Problem of History
Jane Tompkins, author of "'Indians': Textualism, Morality, and Problem of History," questions the validity of every history book and most facts that have been written. She first writes her perspective as a small child and her own young understanding of American Indians. She imagines herself as an Indian playing in...
1,118 words
2 pages
Texas Indians Adapted Will Through Use of Available Resources
The Native American Indians of Texas were as diverse as the State, influenced by the local geography in which they were living. Previous to settling in Texas the Indians migrated from other established cultures in the region. Some scholars believe that some Indians in Texas were offshoots of the Olmec, Mayan and Aztec that...
1,096 words
2 pages
The Process of Adaptation into the Seneca Tribe Described in the Narrative "Captured by Indians" by Mary Jemison
Converting To a New Way of Life In the narrative "Captured by Indians," by Mary Jemison, Jemison describes how the Seneca Indians treated her, taught her how to live and how they cared for her. Throughout Mary Jemison's narrative she illustrates how she lived among the Indians and how she dealt with their way of...
1,037 words
2 pages
Revolt of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico against the Spanish Colonizers
The Spanish first set out to settle New Mexico around 1600. Although there were a few revolts in the first half of the 17th century, Van Hastings Garner believes that the period was one of relative harmony amongst Indians, Spanish officials, and the Spanish religious presence. But in 1680, a multi-tribal revolt destroyed ma...
1,032 words
2 pages
A Description of the Mohawk Indians as the Native Americans as People Who are Local To the Americas
MOHAWK INDIANS Native Americans are people who are local to the Americas. They are also known as American Indians. They tend to have light brown skin, brown eyes, and dark straight hair. The name Indian was first applied to them by Christopher Columbus, who mistakenly believed that the mainland and the islands of t...
384 words
1 page
A Look at the Catholic Indians and Protestant Indians of the 17th and 18th Centuries
In the 17th and 18th centuries, more and more European countries were settling in America, mainly France, Spain, England, and the Dutch. They all had different attitudes toward the Indians. The different approaches they took can be categorized into approaches taken by the Protestant and Catholic countries. There were a far...
522 words
1 page